JEWISH AND KOSHER FRANCE הקהילה היהודית בצרפת: בתי כנסת, בתי חב"ד, אוכל כשר, מסעדות כשרות, מקוואות, מלונות כשרים, ועוד    
   
  GUADELOUPE, FRANCE  
 

JEWISH AND KOSHER GUADELOUPE, FRANCE:

MAP OF GUADELOUPE, FRANCE

SYNAGOGUES IN GUADELOUPE, FRANCE:

The first Jewish group to settle the island consisted of three shiploads of refugees from Brazil in 1654 who were cordially received by the French owner of the island. The Jews initiated sugarcane plantations, and refineries accounted for the island's main exports. "The Black Code" of Louis XIV in 1685 ordered the expulsion of Jews. In the second half of the 20th century, Jews from North Africa and France settled on the island. In 1988 the synagogue Or Sameah was founded together with a community center, Talmud Torah, kosher store, and cemetery

Guadeloupe Communaute' Cultuelle Israelite
Synagogue Or Sameach, Guadeloupe

Bas du Fort #1, Gosier, Point-a-Pitre
Guadeloupe, France

Tel: (0590) 90 99 09-26 80 97 (?) or 590 90 99 08

Fax:
Email:
Website:
Last updated on: October 25, 2010
Please update us!

Mikvah @ Or Sameach Synagogue
Bas du Fort #1, Gosier, Point-a-Pitre
Guadeloupe, France
Tel: 590-690-327-070 / 590-590-903-097
Fax:
Email: hrb971@msn.com
Website:
Last updated on: October 25, 2010
Please update us!

Kosher Restaurant in Guadeloupe:

Le Meron
Salon de Thé , Pâtissier , Glacier
Ouvert tous les soirs sauf le vendredi
Ouvert les midis  du lundi au jeudi
Impasse Pierre Justin - Gde Ravine - Gosier
Tel:05 90 90 70 76  /  06 90 44 86 25
Fax:
Email:
Website:
Supervision: Sous le contrôle du Rav.Haïm Benisti Rabbin de la Guadeloupe
Please update us!

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September 30, 2006: André Schwarz-Bart (b.1928), French novelist of Polish-Jewish origins, died in Guadeloupe. His books included the novel “The Last of the Just” (1960), based on the Jewish teaching that the fate of the world lies with 36 just men.

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JEWISH AND KOSHER FRANCE:

  1. CHABAD CENTERS

  2. GENERAL INFO

  3. JEWISH CEMETERIES 

  4. JEWISH LINKS

  5. KASHRUT AUTHORITIES

  6. KOSHER ESTABLISHMENTS

  7. KOSHER HOTELS

  8. MIKVAOT

  9. SYNAGOGUES 

  10. CORSICA


About Guadeloupe
Guadeloupe has been a French possession since 1635. The island of Saint Martin is shared with the Netherlands; its southern portion is named Sint Maarten and is part of the Netherlands Antilles and its northern portion is named Saint-Martin and is part of Guadeloupe.

Location: Caribbean, islands between the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, southeast of Puerto Rico 

Geographic coordinates: 16 15 N, 61 35 W

Reference Map: Central America & The Caribbean

Size: total: 1,780 sq km

Guadeloupe is an archipelago of nine inhabited islands, including Basse-Terre, Grande-Terre, Marie-Galante, La Desirade, Iles des Saintes (2), Saint-Barthelemy, Iles de la Petite Terre, and Saint-Martin (French part of the island of Saint Martin)
water: 74 sq km
land: 1,706 sq km

Area Comparative: 10 times the size of Washington, DC

Land Boundaries: total: 10.2 km
border countries: Netherlands Antilles (Sint Maarten) 10.2 km

Coastline: 306 km

Climate: subtropical tempered by trade winds; moderately high humidity

Terrain: Basse-Terre is volcanic in origin with interior mountains; Grande-Terre is low limestone formation; most of the seven other islands are volcanic in origin.

Elevation extremes: lowest point: Caribbean Sea 0 m
                                        highest point: Soufriere 1,484 m

Natural Resources: cultivable land, beaches and climate that foster tourism

Natural Hazards: hurricanes (June to October); Soufriere de Guadeloupe is an active volcano.

Geography note: a narrow channel, the Riviere Salee, divides Guadeloupe proper into two islands: the larger, western Basse-Terre and the smaller, eastern Grande-Terre

Population: 440,189 (July 2003 est.)

Ethnic groups: black or mulatto 90%, white 5%, East Indian, Lebanese, Chinese less than 5%

Religions: Roman Catholic 95%, Hindu and pagan African 4%, Protestant 1%

Languages: French (official) 99%, Creole patois

Capital: Basse-Terre

Economy overview: The economy depends on agriculture, tourism, light industry, and services. It also depends on France for large subsidies and imports. Tourism is a key industry, with most tourists from the US; an increasingly large number of cruise ships visit the islands. The traditional sugarcane crop is slowly being replaced by other crops, such as bananas (which now supply about 50% of export earnings), eggplant, and flowers. Other vegetables and root crops are cultivated for local consumption, although Guadeloupe is still dependent on imported food, mainly from France. Light industry features sugar and rum production. Most manufactured goods and fuel are imported. Unemployment is especially high among the young. Hurricanes periodically devastate the economy.

Industries: construction, cement, rum, sugar, tourism

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Sources: